A FOX NEWS STORY HAS BEEN RETRACTED after its fairy tale propaganda was proven to be anything but accurate – no surprise considering their lack of editorial scrutiny. Their story centered around Seth Rich, a Democratic National Committee staffer, who was murdered in May 2016. Fox promoted the false idea that Rich was shot because he had been suspected of turning over DNC emails to WikiLeaks. Meanwhile, police believed his shooting stemmed from a robbery.

Fox must have known their conspiracy theory was full of holes but they ran with it to influence voters and pander to their base, a group who would want to believe such a theory is true. Their fake theory, their fake news, worked because many people were convinced the Democratic Party, not robbers were responsible for the staffer’s death, in particular, Hillary Clinton was believed to be behind the murder.

Even after their story was debunked last week, Fox News continued to run with it for another six days – just to get all the mileage out of it they could. We all have friends or family members who listen or watch Fox News almost exclusively, so there is little wonder how they come up with the ridiculous ideas they come up with.

Fox News, and others like them are a boil on the neck of honest news journalists, who at least attempt to get the story right. Fox News knew the story was fake, but they ran with it for more than a year just the same.

The Fox News Channel wasn’t around before 1987, the year the Fairness Doctrine was scuttled by Ronald Reagan. Fox could not have stood up to the standards of the day. The Fairness Doctrine, created in 1949, required holders of broadcast licenses to provide both sides of any controversial story deemed to be important to the public. Before 1987, the FCC insisted that stories be “honest, equitable and balanced. Fox News would have been removed from the airwaves then because those who governed the rules of the day understood how damaging false information could be, and how gullible some people are to hearing only what they want to hear.

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