Blueprint for a bridge
This will not be a bridge made of metal, stone and wood, but one made of human beings linked together into a communal fabric. Our bridge will be easy to find if we build it on light instead of darkness.
Building a bridge means much more than throwing one’s coat over a puddle to let a pretty girl cross the street dry shod. Building a bridge can be painting a crosswalk on a busy street or nailing a rope to a series of trees through a dark woodland. Building a bridge means more than laying a plank over a gully. True, these are all short-term easy solutions to immediate situations, but bridges imply so much more planning if they are to endure.
A bridge, by its very nature provides a means of getting from point A to point B when an obstacle stands in the way. At other times, depending on the obstacle, a tunnel might be a better solution. In all cases, a bridge is goal oriented. A bridge facilitates movement.
Now if one wants to build a bridge, there are assumptions that surface immediately:
  • What is the imperative to get to point B?
  • What is the nature of the obstacle?
  • How often will the bridge be needed?
  • How many people will use it?
  • How will they travel?
  • What resources await them on the other side?
  • Will this be a one-way bridge or will there be back and forth movement?
  • How will it be maintained?
  • Who will build it?
  • How big does it need to be to be effective?
  • More important than cost, what is the personal effort (sacrifice) promoters are willing to pay to create this bridge?
I suppose pretty much the same effort needs to go into building a wall. The big difference is that bridges open “home” to whoever is on the other side, while a wall shuts people out and isolates those at point A. A bridge is outreach and a wall is self-centered. A bridge can be a means to come and go, but a wall shuts out all that is different. A bridge communicates, but a wall cuts off communication.
The amount of energy can be quite similar for both, but the consequences are very different. A wall can close off a bridge, but a bridge can also breach a wall. Ultimately, what we see is the clash of two cultures: one open and one closed. A closed culture dies off by its very nature while an open culture cross-fertilizes and breathes (or breeds) new life into a dying ideal.
To be effective, we need to seriously answer the questions above. The clearer we are on our intentions, the more effective a bridge we can build. As a liberal force in a closed Trump society, this will need to be a powerful bridge. This will not be a bridge made of metal, stone and wood, but one made of human beings linked together into a communal fabric. Our bridge will be easy to find if we build it on light instead of darkness.
Throwing a coat down over the new swamp will not work, nor will painting lines at this crosswalk of life. We will need to harness all our creativity, our strength and our intelligence to master the growing gap, and to provide hope for a better tomorrow. We will only need one return lane for some stalwart scouts who can lead others over the chasm. Let us call our bridge Hope. Let us call point B Love. Let us call the power to cross over, Faith.
Roger A Chauvette
Editor
Political Nation
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